Nov 182011
 

You whaaaat?

I wanted to name this post, “I do not care: The New Tao of Jeet Kune Do: You can’t make me: The Scott White Story” But that wouldn’t fit in the title line. So you ask, hey Scott, why all the unprovoked anger today? And I say, “You’re not my dad! You can’t tell me what to do! If I want to run around the dojo wearing a Gi top and no pants….” er… thats a discussion for another day. But my inbox has been getting hit over and over again about the new updated release of the Tao of Jeet Kune Do, which in case you don’t know (what kind of martial artist are you anyway?) was Bruce Lee’s martial arts philosophy. Black Belt mag just did an interview with Shannon Lee, Bruce Lee’s daughter regarding the recently released and expanded version. I didn’t read it, but I am guessing she didn’t say, “Our family decided that if George Lucus can re-release Star Wars every couple of years for no apparent reason, so can we. After all, why shouldn’t we make money with almost no work and less point?” Which would be a shame, because I really would respect such honesty. I mean heck, it is America, where every citizen dreams of one day being paid for not doing much. Anyway here’s list of the reasons behind the release.

Continue reading »

Oct 242011
 

We give major props to the Gracies for bringing us both BJJ and UFC. However, mixing the martial arts, and martial artist trying to make better competitions didn’t start in the US with the Gracies. I’d like to introduce two men who should be fairly well known to you, Joe Lewis and Bill “Superfoot” Wallace.

Joe Lewis is a karate fighter. He fought at 195lbs and had a pro kickboxing record of 18-3. Of those wins, 16 of those were by knockout. Mind you, this was during the 70’s, long before this sort of stuff became mainstream. He had a karate base in Shorin Ryu, he trained with Bruce Lee in Jeet kune do, and under Sugar Ray Robinson (legendary boxer). He was voted the greatest karate fighter of all time.

Bill Wallace is best known as a karate fighter. He fought at 165 and had a pro kickboxing record of 22-0 with 13 of his wins by knockout. Although known for his kicking, he  started out as a judo fighter and a wrestler. Due to an awful knee injury to his right leg, he had to take time off of judo training, and was introduced to karate. He also trained quite a bit of boxing. He was voted the second greatest karate fighter of all time (tying with Chuck Norris!). He also was a commentator for the first UFC! (Take that Joe Rogan)

So here we have full contact fighters from the early 70s who mix their martial arts, and even have a grappling back ground! Well both of these men became champions in their own weight divisions, but even after they retired, people wondered who was better. So they called them out of retirement and made them fight. Videos after the break.

Continue reading »